FALL 2017 COURSES

CONFLICT IN AMERICA:
CASE STUDIES IN PEACE-MAKING

12:15 - 1:30 PM EDT, TUESDAY & THURSDAY

American society has often been beset by clashes between different beliefs and cultures. Contemporary America seems more divided than ever before—how do we move forward as a society plagued by these divisions? This course will explore the subject of conflict resolution in local, historical contexts. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of conflict resolution and historical examples of successful resolution, and they will identify and research a case study of conflict resolution from their own communities. More

Jessica Wallace, Georgia College
James Welch, University of Science & Arts of Oklahoma

CULTURAL CROSSROADS:
MIGRATION & COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION

4:00 - 5:15 PM EDT, TUESDAY & THURSDAY

Migration is a constant in human history and is laden with cultural implications. In virtually any locale the movement in of people has occurred, but these migrations are not always at the forefront of the historical memory of a place. In this course students will investigate migration into the community or communities surrounding their campus. This movement may have happened at any time in the community’s history. By bringing to life these stories the students’ Crossroads projects will rescue forgotten local history from obscurity. More

Alvis Dunn, UNC Asheville
Leland Turner, Midwestern State University

"INTO THE WOODS":
EXPERIMENTS IN COMMUNITY, SUSTAINABILITY, & THE EXAMINED LIFE

1:00 - 2:15 PM EDT, MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

As a society we search for alternatives to the hurried life, alternatives Henry David Thoreau famously described as living “deliberately.” This has given rise to communities that practice a sustainable way of life based on contemplation of nature and thoughtful reflection about life. Some of these communities, known as "intentional communities," put down roots in a physical location, but others form “communities of practice” that exchange similar ideas in a digital space. Students will study these communities in connection with their locale. More

Paul Schacht, SUNY Geneseo
Debra Schleef, University of Mary Washington

SPRING 2017 COURSES

DIVIDED HOUSES:
SECESSION & SEPARATION

1 - 2:15 PM EST, MONDAY & WEDNESDAY

What makes a community break apart? At many moments in American political and religious history, secessionists and separatists have threatened to break away from their communities. Students will identify a secessionist or separatist movement in their community and learn skills to help them design a website presenting and analyzing the history of that movement. Who were the members of the secessionist movements? Why was secession or separation seemingly the better solution for their concerns? More

Mary Beth Mathews, University of Mary Washington
Ken Owen, University of Illinois Springfield

MAKING STRANGE: CONSTRUCTING IDENTITIES & MAKING SENSE OF OUR SURROUNDINGS
3:30 - 4:45 PM EST, WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY

This course aims to give students the time and tools to reflect upon the meaning of “strange.” How is strangeness constructed? How do we identify ourselves as being part of a particular culture and nation? What is familiar and what is alien to us and why? Students will venture out into their communities to find local examples of strangeness and familiarity in the form of images, places, legends and stories, sayings, and history and then see how the local fits in with larger narratives. More

Yvonne Franke, Midwestern State University
Janet Wesselius, University of Alberta (Augustana Campus)

THE SOCIAL LIFE OF BOOKS
12:30 - 1:45 PM EST, TUESDAY & THURSDAY

In this course we will learn to see books in new ways. Books often have “lives” of their own, and the stories of the books can be just as intriguing as the stories found within their pages. Students in this class will uncover the hidden lives of books—they will conduct research in their local archives and use books of their choosing to reconstruct the stories of the people who owned and used them. Students will then explore a variety of digital tools necessary to bring these stories from the shelves to a wider audience. More

Benjamin Bankhurst, Shepherd University
Benjamin Pauley, Eastern Connecticut State University